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Calling for Chinese Studies Lunch Seminars and Research Day Presenters

The Chinese Studies Research Group is looking for expressions of interest from Honour students, Masters and PhD students researching any China-related field who are interested in participating in a Chinese Studies Research Seminars / Postgraduate Conference 2013 which will be run approximately six to seven weeks on Fridays through out the year.

2014 Chinese Studies Research Seminars

14 November 2014 (Chinese Studies Research Day)

2015 Chinese Studies Research Seminars

20 March 2015
8 May 2015 (CSRG Fieldwork in China)
26 June 2015
7 August 2015 (CSRG seminar + AGM)
25 September 2015
20 November 2015 (Chinese Studies Research Day)

This is a great opportunity to present your research to a friendly and interested audience of other postgrad students and staff, to get feedback on your ideas and style of presentation, and to practice for a future confirmation, thesis defence or conference paper.

Please email your contact details, department, research topic and preferred date for holding the day to Bick-har Yeung (bhy@unimelb.edu.au).

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminars 14 September 2007

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 3 August 2007

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 22 June 2007

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 11 May 2007

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Chinese Studies Research Day 30 March 2007

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 19 January 2007

Topic: Locating tradition – designed landscapes in China in the context of global interaction, 1995-2005

Speaker: Yun Zhang, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning

 

When: 1-2 pm, 19 January 2007 (Friday).

Where: Tutorial/Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.

RSVP : Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362, e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Summary:

When globalization is transforming the world, the increasing homogeneity of our built environment has caused speculation on many issues including how to become modern and maintain our traditions in the making of landscape?

It is common to relate the traditions of Chinese landscaping to Chinese gardening, the traditional Chinese culture, and to locate this tradition in the gardens of the Ming and Qing dynasties. However, the base of this tradition was transformed in general in the modern age. And in particular, in the last two decades when increasing number of Chinese scholars, practitioners and students who have obtained experience from overseas have returned to work and international design practices with Chinese offices has also increased, this tradition are in the conflicts not only between the old and new, but also in the cultural differencese.

My research aims to investigate the transformation of landscape tradition in a particular space that is in-between China and the west. The objectives are to locate this tradition and their contemporary interpretations in designed landscapes in China in the last decades, and to explain how western and Chinese knowledge interact in the design process. This research is expected to shed light on the culture continuity in the context of globalization.

 

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Chinese Studies Research Day 24 November 2006

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 6 October 2006

Topic: Benchmarking Vocational Education and Training System of China

Speaker: Zhenyi Guo PhD Candidate at CPELL, Faculty of Education

When: 1-2 pm, 6 October 2006 (Friday).

Where: Tutorial/Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.

Information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362, e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Summary

The new century sees immense pressure on China 's vocational education and training (VET) system. The rapid growth of economy of China has accompanied rapid industrialization and urbanization, which have caused a crisis in human resources. China has abundant labour power, but is in great and urgent need of a better skilled labour force. In this context, evaluation of the performance of the VET system becomes an increasingly important task, as it is one way to identify strengths and weaknesses and target areas for development and intervention through initiatives.

The first part of the study is designed to develop a set of internationally comparable indicators for China 's VET system to help evaluate current performance and identify areas of strength and weakness. It is a statistical comparison which will provide a quantitative description of the condition of China 's VET system in comparison with other selected countries.

Based on the identified data availability, the second part of the study will be on continuing vocational education and training. An attempt to adopt the Labour Force Survey questionnaires of Canada will be made to obtain information on continuing vocational education and training in China ( Yunnan ), accompanied by case study interviews to explore and examine the feasibility of the questionnaires in the Chinese context.

When: 1-2 pm, 6 October 2006 (Friday).

Where: Tutorial/Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.

Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362, e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 25 August 2006

Topic: The importance of Kam ‘big song' in establishing and maintaining Kam identity

Speaker: Catherine Ingram, PhD candidate, Faculty of Music / Asia Institute

Summary:

Kam ‘big song' is the main multi-part vocal genre of the Kam people, the eleventh largest of China's 55 recognised minority groups. For centuries ‘big song' has been one of the two indigenous musical genres which have functioned as the primary means of recording and transmitting Kam oral history, culture and language, thereby establishing, ‘identifying' and locating Kam people in place and time. Since the mid 1950s ‘big song' has also assumed further importance: it was widely used as the most prominent example of how Western views of China lacking polyphonic music were incorrect, and has recently (2005) been the central feature of a ten thousand voice choral performance aiming to assert a strong Kam vs. Han Chinese identity, establish a notion of ‘pan-Kam-ness' and attract Han Chinese tourism and investment. Drawing upon 18 months of fieldwork (2004-06) in Kam villages of Guangxi and Guizhou provinces, this paper illustrates big song's ongoing importance in the Kam culture of rapidly changing Kam communities. It considers the historical and contemporary relationship between ‘big song' and Kam identity, and examines how the benefits or disadvantages of assuming a Kam identity have and continue to be felt in the Kam ‘big song' tradition.

When: 1-2 pm, 25 August 2006 (Friday).

Where: Tutorial/Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.

Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362, e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 14 th July 2006

Topic: Singing a Zhuang H ero in R itual - G ender and Heroic Representation o n the Sino-Vietnamese Frontier

Speaker: GAO Yaning, PhD candidate, School of Anthropology , Geography, and Environmental Studies, University of Melbourne

Summary:

In 2005, the Zhuang people of Ande Township o n the Sino-Vietnamese frontier resumed a commemoration of national hero Nong Zhigao which had been interrupted for about fifty years. A historical figure - Nong Zhigao who was considered a barbarian and a traitor in Chinese imperial history is now represented literally as a Zhuang hero in the Chinese Communist Party's nationalities policy. These commemorative activities included literal, central, and male representations, yet in this paper I want to highlight the commemorative performance of a female ritual specialist. This ritual was organized and supported by local women and was conducted a day before a formal semi-official commemoration . The women and the female ritual specialist deliver ed sacrifice to Nong Zhigao in front of his temple in order to guarantee a smooth and safe commemoration.

In this paper, I examine why it is women rather than men who conduct a ritual to beg for the god's blessing for a safe and successful commemoration of Nong Zhigao , and how a female oral ritual practitioner authorizes the tradition of commemoration. In fact, the ritual is not very conventional; rather , it is a fragmentary ritual combining old and invented elements. However, compared to the male dominated ceremony performed the following day, the ritual can be categorically termed more traditional. I suggest that a further investigation of women's and female ritual specialists ' role in Zhuang society would improve our understanding of how a Chinese ethnic minority represent themselves under the influence of the Chinese Communist Party's nationalities policy. My paper will contribute to the current body of knowledge by presenting a study of the Zhuang female role in ritual in China , as well as by providing grass - root s perspective from which we can consider the relationships between the cent er and the periphe ry.

When: 1-2 pm, 14 th July 2006 (Friday).

Where: Tutorial/Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.

Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362, e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 2nd June 2006

Topic: Imperial Extimacy, or, Confessions of a Sinological Pervert.

Speaker: Adam Driver , PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science/Ashworth Programme in Social Theory, The University of Melbourne ( Adam has transferred his PhD candidature to ANU to participate in a project led by Geremie Barmé, and funded through his Federation Fellowship. Contact: adam.driver -at - anu.edu.au)

Summary:
For a manuscript that is explicitly organized around candour, true testimony, and revelation – of secret parts and secrets to desire – Sir Edmund Backhouse's 1943 memoir Decadence Mandchoue has, somewhat ironically, managed to remain forbidden to us. While this is usually explained in terms of its obscene sexual content (making “ordinary publication […] impossible”) or its overly repetitious thematics, the text lays out another, more general economy: one that aligns Backhouse's erotic phantasmagoria of Peking with the libidinal logics of European imperial sovereignty. If the manifest ‘perverse' content of the text – homosexuality, sado-masochism, bestiality – is one marker among many for its original censure, there is a content made doubly latent by Backhouse's Swiss physician and editor, Dr. Reinhard Hoeppli. Dr. Hoeppli is precisely concerned to keep the ‘demonic' side of Backhouse's imperial fantasies, than include the streams of disaffection directed toward Britain and its sovereign agents, and so excises them.
This paper offers a psychoanalytic account of the transgressive aspects of Backhouse's drives, his relationship to a face of imperial sovereignty that remains closed to us, and their constitutive role in the formation of Sinology. The pathologizing exclusion of Backhouse as “valuable […] material for research in sexual perversions” sits simultaneously here with his (per)version of colonial modernity, which returns in an extimate way throughout Decadence Mandchoue , and, indeed, the Sinocentric fields more generally.


When: 1-2 pm , 2 June 2006 (Friday) .
Where: Tutorial / Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.
Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au
Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Special Lunch Seminar 24 May 2006

Topic: China National Research Priorities (Natural Science)
Speaker: Dr Zhai Jinliang, assistant to Prof Li Jiayang who is the Vice President of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
When: 1-2 pm, 24 May 2006 (Wednesday)
Where: Room 321, Third floor, Asia Institute, Sidney Myer Asia Center

Summary:
Dr Zhai Jinliang (currently visiting UM), Associate Professor of Key laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment of CAS, is the Assistant to Prof Li Jiayang who is the Vice President of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). His presentation (in Chinese) will cover: The China National Research Priorities (Natural Science) of Ministry of Science Technology (MOST), China National Natural Science Foundation (NSFC) and Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). He will also outline the areas and opportunities for the penitential collaborations.

Remark: Bring your own lunch
Further information: Bick-har Yeung email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au; phone: 8344-5362

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 13 February 2006

Topic: Urban space and social life in the city of Hangzhou, the capital of Southern Song, China
Speaker: Jia Xu (Jane), PhD candidate in Architecture
Summary:

Hangzhou, as the capital of the Southern Song China, is a typical ‘hybrid' city, a planned city converted from a natural city. Representing a type of traditional Chinese cities, Southern Song Hangzhou was one of the biggest and most prosperous cities in the world, as well as a commercial center, a communication center and a cultural center. It was an organic and energetic city close to life and nature. What are the main characteristics of the urban space and social life in Southern Song Hangzhou? What are the underlying forces that affected the urban space of Hangzhou?

This study analyzes and penetrates into the complicated physical form of Hangzhou, in order to get a more meaningful picture of Chinese urbanity in the past, including the physical characteristics, urban social patterns, and the spiritual aspirations behind. In addition, through critical comparisons with Western theories and ideas on urban space and social life, this research intends to test the validity and suitability of Western theories within a Chinese culture, and hopes such cross-culture study will be beneficial and constructive to both Chinese and Western studies on urban space.

Biography:
Jia Xu obtained her first degree from Zhejiang University in architecture in 1993, and her master degree from Tongji University in architecture and city planning in 1999. After this, she practiced as a Class 1 Registered Architect in Hangzhou, China. At present, she is a PhD student in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne, supervised by Dr. Jianfei Zhu.

When: February 13, 2006, 1 - 2 pm Monday
Where: Architecture Faculty Building Room 527

Further information :

Hao Wu, Phone: 8344-7060 email: haow@unimelb.edu.au
Bick-har Yeung, Phone: 8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks : All welcome, bring your own lunch.
This Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar is combined with the Architecture, Building and Planning Postgraduate Research Seminar series 2006.

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Topic: Fieldwork Experience in Yunan, China

Speaker: Zhenyi Guo, PhD Candidate, Department of Policy and Management, Faculty of Education

Summary: Zhenyi will share the experience of her fieldwork back in Yunnan, China. It consists of two parts: I) Background information II) Fieldwork experiences. It will start from the original fieldwork plan to what really happened in the real situation. Some technical problems encountered and things learnt will be discussed and shared.

When: 1-2 pm , 4th November, 2005 .
Where: Tutorial / Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.
Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au
Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 7 October, 2005

Topic : Wenhua da gang: the Chinese “Culture curriculum” and contemporary research on the methodology of teaching Chinese as a foreign language in China ”.

Speaker : Yongyang (Catherine) WANG, Department of Learning and Educational Development, Faculty of Education, The University of Melbourne

When: 1-2 pm , 7th October, 2005 .
Where: Tutorial / Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library.
Further information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au
Remarks: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 9th September, 2005

Topic : 'Greening the Chinese State: Reforms, Bureaucracy and Environmental Management in Rural China'

Speaker : Alex English, PhD candidate in the School of Anthropology, Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of Melbourne

Summary: Alex English looks at the relationship between the post-Mao reforms, the bureaucracy and local environmental management in rural China. The past two decades of economic reform have accelerated the intensity and spread of environmental degradation. One of the state's responses has been a policy of rapidly establishing nature reserves throughout the countryside. While over 15 percent of China's land mass is already covered by nature reserves, many of these reserves exist only 'on paper'. Despite a well-intentioned policy of preserving China's natural resources within nature reserves, significant gaps in their management remain, largely due to the processes involved in their initial protection. A key factor behind this policy outcome has been the bureaucratic framework of tiaotiao kuaikuai relations or matrix of vertical and horizontal lines of authority. These relations are analysed through the management experience of three nature reserves: Xilingol (Inner Mongolia), Jiuzhaigou (Sichuan) and Changbaishan (Jilin). The talk concludes that the economic, administrative and environmental reforms have brought both opportunities and constraints for China's nature reserves, which operate within a bureaucratic framework characterised by fragmentation and conflict, rather than coordination.


When : 1-2 pm, 9th September, 2005.

Where : Seminar Room, 3rd floor, Sidney Myer Building

Further information : Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks : All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Lunch Seminar 6th of May, 2005

Topic : Experiences of doing course work and research projects in the University of Melbourne.

Speaker : Connie Chuen Ying Yu D.Ed, Education Consultant Dr Yu obtained her Doctor of Education degree in the University of Melbourne in mid December, 2004. She has investigated the leadership role of Hong Kong Protestant Secondary Schools after 1997. Previously she finished a Postgraduate Diploma in Education Studies, and Master of Education by course work and a research project on the teaching of thinking. She will share her experiences about succeeding in course work and research projects.

When : 1-2 pm, 6th May, 2005.

Where : Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

Further information : Bick-har Yeung, phone:8344-5362 email: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

Remarks : All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.

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Chinese Studies Research Group Seminar 5 November 2004

Topic : " Mural painting of Chinese architecture in Yongle Gong of the Yuan dynasty "
Speakers : Hui-chuan Wang, PhD Candidates, Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.
Summary :
In the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), Beijing's Yongle Gong or ‘the Palace of Eternal Joy' was one of the chief Taoist temples, and is the only surviving Taoist temple bearing mural paintings, both figural and architectural. Hui-chuan's research focuses on architectural painting its style and the meaning of its characteristics, graphic methods and painting techniques.

The presentation will be 30 minutes. There will be 20 minutes for questions and discussions. Hui-chuan will spend the remaining 10 minutes demonstrating some of the techniques that she applies in her Powerpoint presentation.

When : 1-2 pm, 5 November 2004 Friday
Where : Committee/ Tutorial Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library
Remark : All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.
Further Information : Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362; e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au
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  • Chinese Studies Research Group Seminar - 1st October 2004

    Topic: Endnote 7 for Chinese Studies" : database demos, questions and discussions.
    Speaker: Sabina Robertson. Sabina is the Research Consultant based in Room G35, East Wing of the School of Graduate Studies. Sabina's role is to help and advise you in making the most of the Library's services and resources.

    When: 1-2 pm, 1st October 2004 Friday
    Where: Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

    Remark: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.
    Further Information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362; e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

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    Chinese Studies Research Group Seminar - 3rd September 2004


    Topic: Finding resources in the Shanghai Library and alternative places

    Speaker: Hsueh Sheng Chen , PhD Candidates, Melbourne Institute of Asian Languages and societies, University of Melbourne.

    Hsueh Sheng has just returned from Shanghai from his research trip. He will share his experiences about how to get the most out of the Shanghai Library, especially for those hard to find materials. Periodicals before 1949 are actually not available through the online system and will need special attention to get access. As the biggest city in China, Shanghai is a great place for book hunters, especially for materials before 1949. A general introduction to the secondhand bookstores and markets in Shanghai, where to find them and how to deal with those greedy dealers, will also be included in this talk.

    When: 1-2 pm, 3 September 2004 Friday
    Where: Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

    Remark: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.
    Further Information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362; e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

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    Chinese Studies Research Group Seminar - 6 August 2004

    Topic: Building bridges: experiences in collaborative fieldwork research in China

    Speakers: Alex English and Brooke McDonald , PhD Candidates, School of Anthropology, Geography & Environmental Studies, University of Melbourne.

    Alex and Brooke will discuss and answer questions about some of the ins and outs of undertaking collaborative or joint fieldwork research in China as part of their respective PhDs.
    Alex has been working with the Chinese Academy of Sciences on nature reserve management and inter-governmental coordination in rural China. Brooke's research has focused on the Three Gorges Dam resettlement program where she has been collaborating with the Three Gorges University in Yichang, Hubei.

    When: 1-2 pm, 6 August 2004 Friday
    Where: Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

    Remark: All welcome. Bring your own lunch. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be served.
    Further Information: Bick-har Yeung, phone: 8344-5362; e-mail: bhy@unimelb.edu.au

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    Chinese Studies Postgraduates Support Group April 2004 Seminar

    Topic: Doing Fieldwork in China
    1. Importance of fieldwork
    2. Fieldwork Preparation
    3. Real challenges in the real 'field'
    4. Discussion: students' fieldwork plan

    Speaker: Dr. Mark Wang , Senior Lecturer, School of Anthropology, Geography and Environmental Studies,The University of Melbourne

    When: 2nd April 2004 Friday 1-2 pm
    Where: Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

    Remark: Please bring your own lunch. Tea and coffee will be served.
    Further Information: Bick-har Yeung bhy@unimelb.edu.au

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    Chinese Studies Postgraduates Support Group Meeting - November 5 Wednesday 2004

    Topic: Experiences of working a PH D in the University of Melbourne

    Speaker: Dr. Liping Du , Lecturer in Chinese, MIALS

    Dr Du obtained his Master of Education in La Trobe and PH D in Melbourne (2002). His research area is: Marketing of traditional medicines and indigenous medical culture in Guangxi.

    When: 2nd April 2004 Friday 1-2 pm
    Where: Committee Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

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